Americans and Chinese Divided Over Broken Institutions

Americans and Chinese Divided Over Broken Institutions

Statista′s Dyfed Loesche explans this relevant difference in perspective.

The level of trust in societal institutions differs in America and China. According to data compiled by public relations firm Edelman, most Chinese think businesses are the foremost broken institutions, while Americans are highly concerned with a broken government. Overall, Chinese distrust is more spread out between the institutions than American institutional weariness. According to the Edelman Trust Barometer report, “No country saw steeper declines than the United States, with a 37-point aggregate drop in trust across all institutions.”

Trump on Twitter (Stats)

Trump on Twitter (Stats)

A report by Statista′s Martin Armstrong:

Borne partly out of his mistrust and lack of control of the media, President Trump utilizes his Twitter account to get his message out, make announcements, vent, provoke and often simply provide a stream of consciousness on any current issues. This infographic pulls together some key facts and figures on one of Trump’s most powerful tools.

NK/Statista

Imagen inicial: Composición de Lúdico con insumos de Pixabay.

Do you Work More than 39 Hours a Week? Think it over!

Do you Work More than 39 Hours a Week? Think it over!

The Guardian tells that “long hours, stress and physical inactivity are bad for our wellbeing – yet we’re working harder than ever. Isn’t it time we fought back?

When a new group of interns recently arrived at Barclays in New York, they discovered a memo in their inboxes. It was from their supervisor at the bank, and headed: “Welcome to the jungle.” The message continued: “I recommend bringing a pillow to the office. It makes sleeping under your desk a lot more comfortable … The internship really is a nine-week commitment at the desk … An intern asked our staffer for a weekend off for a family reunion – he was told he could go. He was also asked to hand in his BlackBerry and pack up his desk.”

Although the (unauthorised) memo was meant as a joke, no one laughed when it was leaked to the media. Memories were still fresh of Moritz Erhardt, the 21-year-old London intern who died after working 72 hours in a row at Bank of America. It looked as if Barclays was also taking the “work ethic” to morbid extremes.

Following 30 years of neoliberal deregulation, the nine-to-five feels like a relic of a bygone era. Jobs are endlessly stressed and increasingly precarious. Overwork has become the norm in many companies – something expected and even admired. Everything we do outside the office – no matter how rewarding – is quietly denigrated. Relaxation, hobbies, raising children or reading a book are dismissed as laziness. That’s how powerful the mythology of work is.

Technology was supposed to liberate us from much of the daily slog, but has often made things worse: in 2002, fewer than 10% of employees checked their work email outside of office hours. Today, with the help of tablets and smartphones, it is 50%, often before we get out of bed.

Read complete article in The Guardian


Is Job-Growth Slowdown a Good Thing?

Is Job-Growth Slowdown a Good Thing?

Because, according a report by Bloomberg: “If the expansion is going to get a second wind, it’s likely to come in the form of faster wage gains.”

Excepts:

“The U.S. economy is still creating lots of jobs, with a seasonally adjusted 148,000 added in December and 2.2 million (not seasonally adjusted, for reasons I discuss below) for full-year 2017, according to Friday’s employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

That 2.2 million is up a little (93,000 jobs, to be misleadingly precise about it) from 2016’s total, but it’s down substantially from earlier in the current economic expansion.

You may have seen other reports indicating that job growth this year was slightly less than in 2016. That’s true according to the seasonally adjusted numbers from the BLS, but when calculating annual totals I figure seasonal adjustments only muck things up, so I went with the unadjusted data. Also, all these numbers are going to change next month anyway in an annual benchmark revision. So I wouldn’t make too much of a 100,000-job shift in either direction!”

(…) We may be about to experience another such second wind now, as a business sector encouraged by tax cuts and deregulatory attitudes in Washington invests in job-creating new projects. But don’t expect it to be all that dramatic with the unemployment rate at just 4.1 percent — about as low as it has been since the late 1960s. 1 The prime-working-age (ages 25 to 54) employment-population ratio is still well below its late-1990s peak, indicating some remaining labor-market slack, but the prime-age population, which was growing in the late 1980s and 1990s, really isn’t now. If this expansion does in fact get a second wind, it seems likelier to pay out in wage gains than in accelerating job growth.

Read complete article in Bloomberg

Read also the report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Bitcoin and The Tulip Bubble (Data)

The Bitcoin and The Tulip Bubble (Data)

Is the Bitcoin a bubble poised to burst anytime soon? Some say yes, others say no. But in this case, Statista compares it with probably the most famous case of an inflated market: The Tulip Bubble in XVII century in The Netherlands. 

During the so-called Tulip Mania contract prices for some bulbs of the recently introduced and very fashionable tulip reached extremely high levels and then dramatically collapsed in February 1637. It was the first reasonably well document asset bubble in history and until now is referred to as the prime example of a market folly.

What this chart indicates is that while technology has advanced greatly over the course of the past 400 years, human psychology has remained the same. Some observers think the rally around the crypto currency Bitcoin might replace Tulip Mania as a reference for a badly overinflated asset bubble prone to burst at any moment.

Then again, there already has been deflation from the peak of a little more than 19,900 to 17,600 dollars per Bitcoin. But nobody knows if the puncture will let the balloon slowly deflate or it will rip it apart, crash landing the Bitcoin.

Fuente: Statista / Neorika


Countries With The Highest Taxes (Data)

Countries With The Highest Taxes (Data)

Statista show us that the US, comparatively is not the worst tax collector. Take a look.

Tax revenues as a share of GDP averaged 34.3 percent across OECD countries last year, the highest figure since records began in 1965. The ratio indicates the share of a country’s output that is collected by the government through tax and it’s regarded a key measure of the degree to which a government controls a country’s resources. In 2016, Greece had the biggest increase in its tax-to-GDP ratio (2.2 percent) while Denmark had the highest in the OECD at 45.9 percent. Danes really know about high tax levels.

This is especially true when it comes to buying an automobile which involves paying a whopping 150 percent registration tax. Even though there have been proposals to reduce that to 100 percent, Denmark is still one of the most expensive countries in which to buy a vehicle. Take the cost of a basic Volkswagen Golf which has a $34,000 pricetag in Denmark, according to Bloomberg. The same car would cost $21,500 in Germany where it’s made while the price in Poland would only amount to $18,900. While the tax-to-GDP ratio comes to 45.3 percent of GDP in France, it’s actually far lower in the United States. Taxes in the U.S. are relatively low in relation to other developed nations with most revenuecoming from personal taxes on income and social security income tax. The U.S. does of course maintain high levels of corporation tax but some companies manage to get around it by shifting their operations overseas or reducing investment. Last year, taxes at all levels of U.S. government came to 25.3 percent of GDP.

NK/Statista


Imagen: Pixabay.com.